funeral homes in Palisade, CO

Basic Funeral Home Services

When most people think about funeral homes in Palisade, CO, they most likely picture undertakers in dark suits, flowers and caskets. Funeral homes are actually much more than that. Funeral homes all over the country offer lots of different services with the overall intention of helping the bereaved not only plan and execute a respectful service to honor the deceased, but also to get through the many different steps and actions associated with a death.

Some common funeral home services include help with planning:

  • Funerals – A funeral is a formal event or ceremony about the deceased, typically with religious or cultural leanings. Funerals are mostly used to remember and celebrate a death, and to allow family and friends to grieve together. A funeral usually happens a few days after death in a funeral home, church, or even the deceased’s house. For an event to be a true funeral, it requires the body to be present and intact. Most funerals have reading, hymns, sermons, eulogies or speeches throughout the ceremony.
  • Memorial Services – Memorial services are very similar to funerals, except for a few key differences. Fist, the body does not have to be present at a memorial service. Since the body is not present, there is no time or scheduling constraints for memorial services, and the body can be cremated beforehand. Memorial services are typically less religious and more informal than funerals, and are hosted in a variety of locations.
  • Committal (or Graveside) Services – While memorials and funerals oftentimes include a graveside service, graveside services can also be performed independently from other funeral and cremation services. When a graveside service is not preceded by a funeral or memorial, it’s called a committal. Committal services are generally very brief, but have some ceremony around lowering the body into the grave and covering it with soil. These services take place at the cemetery, columbarium, mausoleum, or wherever the body’s final resting place may be.
  • Viewings and Visitations – Viewings and visitations are also generally held in tandem with a funeral or memorial as they allow family and friends to visit with and express sympathy for the funeral hosts. Viewings and visitations help people grieve together in an intimate, less formal setting. Visitations are events in which family, friends, acquaintances and more can stop by to express sympathy and grief with the immediate family of the deceased. They are usually held at the funeral home, but can sometimes take place in a church, home or other location. Viewings are when the deceased’s casket is open for final goodbyes and visits. They occur before or during the visitation.

Funeral homes also help the bereaved with:

  • Transfer of the deceased from the place of death
  • Help notifying relatives, friends and coworkers
  • Filing all permits, certificates, and authorizations
  • Planning special ceremonies or events including Veteran’s services
  • Assistance with social security claims

Not every funeral home offers the same services, so be sure to check with your local funeral homes for a complete list of their services. We here at Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, would be happy to share our Palisade, CO funeral home services. Give us a call at (970) 255-8888.

cremation services in Aspen, CO

Are Cremation Services Green?

As our planet continues to suffer from worse and worse climate change, many people are beginning to as the question: “What can I do?” A posthumous, non-traditional way to help the environment is through cremation. A lot of people never even think about burials’ environmental impact, but a few small changes to funerals and services can go a long way.

If you are looking for a green way to celebrate the life of a loved one, or prepare for your own passing in an environmentally friendly way, cremation services in Aspen, CO might be the answer. Make an informed decision on how best to make your cremation environmentally conscious.

Cremation has a lot of positive sides over traditional burials. One of the main ones is environmental impact. Traditional, full service burials have considerable negative impact on the environment. One big example is loss of habitat. A recent statistic from the Centre for National Burial states that 10 acres of cemetery holds almost 20,000 tons of vault concrete, 1000 tons of casket steal, and enough wood to build over 40 full-sized homes. All that material leaves little room for animal and plant life.

On the whole, thanks to modern advances, cremation is a greener choice. However, there are some downsides to cremation in terms of the environment. Standard crematoriums burn a lot of natural gas, and therefore release lots of greenhouse gases and chemical vapors that can harm the atmosphere.

Also, to fully dehydrate a human body to bone and ash, a crematorium has to be fully heated to at least 1400 degrees Fahrenheit, and maintain the heat for a minimum of 45 minutes. This process releases a lot of carbon dioxide, and uses up a lot of fossil fuel. But, new technology and more fuel-efficient crematorium centers have greatly reduced these negative impacts.

There are ways you personally can make cremation even greener. Some of these include:

  • Choose the casket carefully. Cremation providers generally require bodies to be in a rigid, consumable, and leak-proof casket for the cremation process. Burning these caskets can give off noxious gases and fumes, if you chose a bad one. When picking out your cremation casket, look for one made of non-toxic and renewable material. Wicker and cardboard are great options.
  • Recycle medical materials. Remove and recycle medical devices and parts, like pacemakers, before cremation. Burning said parts can release harmful gases and produce non-biodegradable ash.
  • Consider a biodegradable urn. Many people chose to bury their loved one’s ashes after cremation. While urns and ashes take up less space than a full-size grave, urns slow down the decay process and may negatively impact the surrounding earth. Choose a biodegradable urn to better protect the local ground.

Be careful to remain aware of your options when it comes to Aspen, CO cremation services so you can feel good about your choice in terms of the environment and celebrating your loved one. If you want more information, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help. Please visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us call at (970) 255-8888.

funeral homes in Aspen, CO

Do I Need An Estate Planning Attorney?

No one wants to think about their own final visit to one of the funeral homes in Aspen, CO, but its important to plan and protect your family in case anything should happen to you before your time, or in the event of your eventual passing. An estate-planning attorney might be able to help you do that.   

Estate planning attorneys help guide you through the process of deciding how you want to divide your assets, gathering and preparing necessary post-life documents, and making sure your wishes are carried out after you’re gone. These lawyers are important because sometimes, without proper legal advice, affairs are left up to family members that are unsure of your wishes, or, in the worst case, might fight over the decisions. Estate lawyers can help you draft, review, and authorize important documents such as:  

  • Last will and testament 
  • Trust 
  • Durable power of attorney 
  • Medical durable power of attorney 
  • Beneficiary designations  

Like all other lawyers, estate-planning attorneys charge fees. They generally charge a flat rate for prepping your desired documents and a per hour rate for more complicated tasks like handling disputes or carrying out the will. The exact rates depend on where you live and what caliber of lawyer you wish to procure. Be sure to decide on rates up front with your lawyer to protect yourself from getting over charged.   

The questions remains, however, do you need an estate-planning lawyer?   

For most people, the answer is generally no. You don’t really need an estate planning unless:  

  • Your net worth is more than $5 million. If you have a large net worth, your estate might be subject to estate tax. In that case, it’s a good idea to consult a lawyer to make sure that your beneficiaries get what you wish as opposed to it being taken by taxes.  
  • You own large or many properties. Dividing up property can be tricky as titles are held in many ways and there are often confusing technicalities that you might be unaware of. In some cases, you might not even have the right to bequeath certain properties. An experiences lawyer can help guide you through these confusing laws to make sure your property is dealt with appropriately.  
  • You have special circumstances. From children with disabilities to foreign property or heirs, special circumstances and finances are tough to navigate. A specialized estate-planning attorney can show you the way to get through such special circumstances.  

If you’re unsure if you need an estate-planning lawyer, it couldn’t hurt to get a consultation. Remember, most lawyers do charge fees even for consultations, but sometimes peace of mind is worth the small cost.   

If you have more questions about estate planning, or want to know more about preplanning for your passing, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service would love to help. We are an Aspen, CO funeral home located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 8150. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 today.  

 

cremation services in Grand Junction, CO

Preplanning Cremation Services

Death is always difficult for the bereaved, and it always will be. However, there is one way you can make your passing a little easier on your loved ones: choosing to preplan your cremation services in Grand Junction, CO. Preplanning your cremation can not only make sure your wishes are followed but can also relieve your family and loved ones of the stress of dealing with the details after you’re gone.

While there are a lot of decisions that go into a cremation, preplanning isn’t as hard as you might think. In fact, preplanning can be broken down into a few simple steps. The first step is to decide where you want to be cremated. Look into funeral homes and crematories in the area, making sure to investigate pricing and services offered. Once you decide on a location, you then have to consider what kind of cremation you want. Some of the most common options include:

  • Traditional setting with a funeral service before the cremation, generally with the casket present
  • Memorial service after the cremation, typically similar in structure to a funeral but the urn or a photo takes place of the casket
  • Internment ceremony in which the ashes are interred or scattered after the cremation

You then have to think about and decide on the smaller cremation details, including what kind of urn you want, where you want to be buried or scattered, or if you want to go in a different direction all together. There are many options for the ashes after cremation such as:

  • Internment at a cemetery or family plot
  • Scattering in a special place, over water, or even in the air. There are ash scattering restrictions that vary by state and county
  • Kept in an urn by family or friends

The final step is to think about how you will pay for your cremation. Be sure to contact your life insurance company, because, even though they won’t begin funding before death, it’s a good idea to make sure they understand your plans. Explain your insurance coverage to your family so they also understand how your insurance will cover the services. If you are planning on providing the funding yourself, make a specific plan and put it in place. Make sure everyone involved understands who is covering what and what kind of budget you have.

It’s important to remember that the preplanning process isn’t something you should do on your own. Since you will be gone when the decisions are put into action, you need to be sure you clearly communicate with your family, friends and other loved ones about your wishes.

Your family can also be a part of the process, and help you make some difficult decisions such as where the cremation will be and what kind of memorial. In talking about these decisions with loved ones, be sure to document what you decide, either in your will or with the funeral home you have selected.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, can help you with preplanning or any other Grand Junction, CO cremation service need. Give us a call at (970) 255-8888 today.

funeral home in Grand Junction, CO

From Death To The Funeral Home

It may seem impossible to get ready for a funeral home in Grand Junction, CO after a death. Losing a loved one is hard enough without all the stress of details, decisions and planning. However, if you follow these 7 steps, you will have a much easier time preparing for a funeral or cremation:

1. Report the Death – The first step is to report the death to the proper authorities. If the death is at a hospital, nursing home, or hospice, the officials there will know what to do and will make the report for you. If you are at home, or have no other options, call 911.

2. Prepare To Work With A Funeral Director – You will need the assistance of a funeral director to complete the death certificate, transport and store the body. Take note if the deceased made pre-arrangements for his or her funeral, and be prepared to relay these wishes to the funeral director.

3. Pick a Type of Service – There are several funeral service and cremation options you need to be prepared to choose from:

  • Funerals, in which the service is held before the body is cremated or buried and the body is present
  • Memorials, in which the service is help after the body is buried or cremated and therefore not present
  • Graveside services in which the funeral takes place at the grave

4. Make Cemetery Arrangements – If you choose a burial rather than a cremation you will need to make cemetery arrangements. Decide where the burial will take place, and if necessary purchase a plot. If you’re unsure where to start, your funeral home will most likely be affiliated with a cemetery and can help you find a plot. You could also check with your church, synagogue or other place of worship for further guidance.

5. Make Funeral Arrangements – Feel free to get creative when making funeral or memorial arrangements to make the service personal and meaningful. Flowers, music, pre or post service events and other special touches help make the service personal for you and the deceased.

6. Inform The Family and Write Death Notice – Personally inform all close family, friends and loved ones of the death, ideally over the phone or in person. If you’re nervous, take the time to write a script to help you make key points. Don’t forget to write and release a death notice to notify the rest of the friends, coworkers, associates etc.

7. List Pre-Funeral Tasks – Make a list of what you need to accomplish before the funeral to help you stay organized and not forget anything important. This list could include your attire, personal items or collecting photos.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help guide you from a loss to the funeral home with our experience and expertise. You can visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about our Grand Junction, CO funeral home services.

cremation services in Palisade, CO

Cremation Service History In America And Beyond

Though cremation services in Palisade, CO have become more popular in recent years, they aren’t a new fad at all. In fact, historians believe that humans started burning their dead as early as 3000 B.C, as they have discovered pottery shards and urns that service as evidence.

Cremation became more and more popular around Europe and what we now call the Middle East until Homer’s time, around 800 B.C, when it became the most common disposition method. This rise in cremation is assumed to be because of the growing number of dead from both war and disease.

By 395 A.D, cremation and the Roman Empire were at their peaks. In fact, ancient Romans stored cremated remains in decorated urns like we do today. However, the early Christians still practiced traditional Jewish body disposition, and therefore disapproved of cremation. This proved to be ancient cremation’s downfall, because when Constantine made Christianity the official Roman religion in 400 A.D, the practice almost disappeared in favor of the traditional Jewish burial.

Cremation drifted out of history until around 1873 when an Italian professor displayed his new cremation chamber model at the Vienna Exposition. His new invention jump-started the cremation revolution on both sides of the Atlantic.The first modern cremation chamber in the United States was built in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1876 by Dr. Julius LeMoyne, with the second not far behind in Lancaster, PA in 1884. Soon, crematories were being built all across the US, and by the year 1900 there were 20 in operation.

The practice took off even more when, in 1913, Dr. Hugo Erichsen started the Cremation Association of America as a way to spread to word about this modern way of safely and hygienically disposing of bodies. The foundation was originally made up of doctors with concerns about the spread of diseases from whole-body burials to living humans.

This belief and the foundation continued to foster cremation popularity until the 1920s when it was proven that whole body burials, when done properly were just as safe for the public’s health. After that discovery, the Cremation Association of America switched gears and began promoting cremation not as a health choice but as a personal choice. The foundation changed its name to Cremation Association of North America (CANA), in 1975, and is still around today.

Cremation has been becoming more and more popular since the 1980s in America and around the world. This rise is due to a number of factors such as cost, environmental concerns, creativity, religion and more. While traditional burial is still the most commonly seen disposition method, studies show that might not always be the case. According to CANA, there were over 2,100 crematories in use in the US in 2009 performing over 9,000 cremations a year, and the numbers are still going up.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is honored to be a part of the continuing Palisade, CO cremation service tradition. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 for more information.

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO

History of the American Funeral Home

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO and the rest of the United States have long and fascinating history. Before the mid 1800s, the dead were never that far from home when they passed. So, the bodies were often displayed in the family home’s front room, or the parlor, immediately after death and before burial.

There were a few methods used to prolong decomposition, but they were not readily accepted. Therefore, funerals took place quickly, and in the home. Then, in 1865, President Lincoln’s body was embalmed after his assassination to prevent decomposition during the nationwide funeral train. As a result, people around the country began to accept the idea of embalming bodies as commonplace.

As embalming became more popular, families were able to expand the funeral services beyond the home. As the bodies were able to be transported and displayed, more neutral settings grew in popularity as families could invite more people to celebrate the deceased and host more formal events, creating the need for a formal funeral home or parlor. Formal cemeteries were also becoming more widespread in lieu of home burials, as the United States government formed military cemeteries for fallen soldiers after the war.

The Bucktrout family in Virginia saw a growing market, and rose to the occasion. Originally coffin and cabinet manufacturers, the Bucktrout family grew their business to include funeral home services similar to those we have today, becoming the country’s first funeral home.

The funeral home market grew, and businesses continued to expand. However, funeral homes were still all family owned and operated. In fact, most undertakers (as they were called then) used their home to run their funeral business. This is most likely where the name “funeral home” comes from.

More and more funeral homes were established in the 1900s all across the country. With this expansion, formal training for undertakers became crucial for further expansion and proper service. The conversation changed a bit, and they began to be known as funeral directors and morticians. The National Funeral Directors Association was formed in the early 1900s to help consumers view the members as professionals.

Coffin makers, florists, life insurance agencies and other connected fields followed suit, and the funeral home business continued to blossom into what it is today. By 1920, there were around 24,469 funeral homes in the United States, showing a 100% growth in just under 80 years.

Like other United States institutions, funeral homes grew out of Christian backgrounds. However with the relaxation of immigration laws in the 1960s, there was an influx of new beliefs and cultures. Funeral homes rose to the occasion, and began offering services for other ethnic and religious groups from Vietnamese and Eastern European to Buddhism and Hinduism.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is continuing the tradition of Palisade, CO funeral home service. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss.

Aspen, CO cremation services

How To Talk To Your Family About Preplanning Cremation Services

You know how important it is to preplan your Aspen, CO cremation services, but do you also know that you should talk to your family and loved ones about your plans? As necessary as this conversation is, it can also be very difficult. Loved ones don’t want to think about losing you, much less talk about the details of your cremation.

As hard as it is to talk about preplanning, your family will appreciate it in the long run. If you’re ready to start preplanning for your cremation, but aren’t quite sure how to breach the subject with your loved ones, use the following tips to help:

  1. Know What You Want – Don’t try and talk to your family about your post-death wishes until you know what they are. Take time before you bring up the subject to research, think about and decide precisely what you want. What kind of service do you want? Do you want a burial or cremation? Viewing or visitation? What’s the budget? Once you know the answer to those questions, you’ll be better able to express your concrete wishes to your family.
  2. Get Ready For High Emotions: While you’ve taken time to plan and get used to the idea of your own passing, your family and loved one’s most likely have not. The people you love will need some time to process all the emotions associated with your probable, eventual or impending death and loss. They might get angry with you, experience denial about the conversation’s necessity, or be just plain sad at the idea of losing you. If things get too emotional, take a break and continue the conversation once everyone has calmed down a bit.
  3. Listen and Answer: Even though your final wishes are ultimately your decision and all about what you want, your loved ones will still want to have some input. Be ready to listen to their concerns and to answer any questions they might have. If you don’t have the answer right away, take the time you need to come up with one.
  4. Stay Strong: While its important to listen to what your family has to say about your final wishes, it’s still mostly your decision at the end of the day. Don’t be afraid to be firm about what you want, and stand up for decisions that are important to you. Once you’ve come to a decision everyone can be happy with, it’s a great idea to have a legal document drawn up with all the details so there are no questions after you’re gone.

While discussing your death with your loved ones will never be easy, it’s always worth it because preplanning will give everyone peace of mind.

If you would like more assistance with preplanning a cremation service in Aspen, CO, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help. Visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or call us at (970) 255-8888.

funeral home in Aspen, CO

Obituaries and Funeral Homes

From choosing a funeral home in Aspen, CO to picking out flowers, there’s a lot to accomplish when you lose a loved one. Your long to-do list can be stressful, so why not learn some basic information about one of your tasks now to help assuage this stress? You can start with obituaries.

Obituaries are a traditional way to let family and friends publically celebrate the life of the deceased, and announce the death in a compassionate manner. To be better prepared to write an obituary for your lost loved one, here are the common parts of obituaries:

  • Announcement of Death – Obituaries usually start with basic information such as the name, age, and place of residence of the deceased. This is followed by the death announcement, including the time and place of death. Most people choose to use a softer word or term that “death,” such as “passed away”, “died”, “went to be with the Lord” etc. Many people are unsure whether or not to list the cause of death in the obituary. At the end of the day, the cause of death is only the family’s business, and does not need to be shared unless the immediate family chooses.
  • Biographical Sketch – The key word in this portion is “sketch.” Many people are tempted to write a full account of the deceased’s life. While some people may find that interesting or helpful, the obituary is only meant to detail the most important aspects of his life. Some key pieces to include are the date and place of birth, parent’s names including mother’s maiden name, date and place of marriage, birth name of spouse, education, work, and military service. Feel free to list events chronologically, or to take a more creative approach. Don’t forget to mention specific important relationships and the effect the deceased had on people’s lives.
  • Family – As the saying goes, the funeral is for the living. The same can be said for the obituary, so a key element is listing the surviving family members and loved ones. Take care to not forget anyone, but don’t feel the need to list every single member of the extended family.
  • Service Times – While tradition varies on this element, most obituaries include funeral information so people can attend if they choose. List the essentials: time, full date and place of service along with the name of the officiate; time, full date and place of burial or interment if applicable; and finally, time, full date and place of visitation.
  • Special Messages – Most people choose to include a special thank you or message at the end. This may also include a prayer or poem.
  • Photos – Include a photo. While this adds to the cost, it is a lovely way to remind people of their connected to the deceased.

Contact Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service by visiting 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501 or calling (970) 255-8888, to learn more about obituaries or Aspen, CO funeral homes.

cremation services in Grand Junction, CO

After Cremation Services

Whether you’re planning for your eventual passing or dealing with the recent death of a loved one, one big choice is body disposition. If you choose to go with cremation services in Grand Junction, CO, you have even more choices coming your way as there are quite a few options when it comes to cremated remains.

Just because you chose a cremation service doesn’t mean you can’t also have a burial. In fact, many people have both as you cane easily bury or entomb cremated remains. This option helps you stay more on track with traditional burials and funerals while also using cremation services. There are a few options for burial or entombment after cremation including:

  • Columbarium: Columbarium are spaces specifically dedicated to housing and interring cremated remains Most often found in churches, there are also a few freestanding columbarium options as well as those attached to cemeteries.
  • Memorial Object: A non-traditional burial method for cremated remains is in a special memorial object like a bench, grave marker, rock or even in a tree. This method and special objects help loved ones memorialize and celebrate their lost in more personalized ways.
  • Crypt or Mausoleum: Go more religious or familial with a crypt or mausoleum. These options are usually preferred by Roman Catholics, but can get pretty expensive.
  • Family Plot: The most traditional burial for cremation remains is in the family plot or cemetery. Burial in the family plot is an easy way to use cremation services while still enjoying classic burial and funeral traditions.

The most common, and traditional, way to inter cremated remains is by scattering. The options for scattering are almost limitless, but some widespread choices are:

  • Casting: Casting ashes simply means tossing the cremated remains on the wind, usually in a special location. Be sure to check the wind direction to avoid uncomfortable moments.
  • Raking: Raking ashes happens when a family member or loved one by pours the ashes over loose soil and rakes them to combine the two. Local ordinances and laws generally prevent raking at any old spot, so make sure to check with the authorities before raking in a public garden or park.
  • Water Scattering: You can also scatter ashes into any body of water, again with permission from the local authorities. Another version of water scattering is to sink a water-soluble urn into the lake, river or ocean.
  • Ringing: Ringing involves more of a ceremony than other post-cremation choices. It involves forming a ring around an object like a house, tree or other special thing with the ashes, almost to compound the idea that the deceased is always with you and protecting you.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is an expert Grand Junction, CO cremation service provider. We have a wide range of options, and would be happy to help you in your time of need Please visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more.