funeral home in Grand Junction, CO

From Death To The Funeral Home

It may seem impossible to get ready for a funeral home in Grand Junction, CO after a death. Losing a loved one is hard enough without all the stress of details, decisions and planning. However, if you follow these 7 steps, you will have a much easier time preparing for a funeral or cremation:

1. Report the Death – The first step is to report the death to the proper authorities. If the death is at a hospital, nursing home, or hospice, the officials there will know what to do and will make the report for you. If you are at home, or have no other options, call 911.

2. Prepare To Work With A Funeral Director – You will need the assistance of a funeral director to complete the death certificate, transport and store the body. Take note if the deceased made pre-arrangements for his or her funeral, and be prepared to relay these wishes to the funeral director.

3. Pick a Type of Service – There are several funeral service and cremation options you need to be prepared to choose from:

  • Funerals, in which the service is held before the body is cremated or buried and the body is present
  • Memorials, in which the service is help after the body is buried or cremated and therefore not present
  • Graveside services in which the funeral takes place at the grave

4. Make Cemetery Arrangements – If you choose a burial rather than a cremation you will need to make cemetery arrangements. Decide where the burial will take place, and if necessary purchase a plot. If you’re unsure where to start, your funeral home will most likely be affiliated with a cemetery and can help you find a plot. You could also check with your church, synagogue or other place of worship for further guidance.

5. Make Funeral Arrangements – Feel free to get creative when making funeral or memorial arrangements to make the service personal and meaningful. Flowers, music, pre or post service events and other special touches help make the service personal for you and the deceased.

6. Inform The Family and Write Death Notice – Personally inform all close family, friends and loved ones of the death, ideally over the phone or in person. If you’re nervous, take the time to write a script to help you make key points. Don’t forget to write and release a death notice to notify the rest of the friends, coworkers, associates etc.

7. List Pre-Funeral Tasks – Make a list of what you need to accomplish before the funeral to help you stay organized and not forget anything important. This list could include your attire, personal items or collecting photos.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help guide you from a loss to the funeral home with our experience and expertise. You can visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about our Grand Junction, CO funeral home services.

cremation services in Palisade, CO

Cremation Service History In America And Beyond

Though cremation services in Palisade, CO have become more popular in recent years, they aren’t a new fad at all. In fact, historians believe that humans started burning their dead as early as 3000 B.C, as they have discovered pottery shards and urns that service as evidence.

Cremation became more and more popular around Europe and what we now call the Middle East until Homer’s time, around 800 B.C, when it became the most common disposition method. This rise in cremation is assumed to be because of the growing number of dead from both war and disease.

By 395 A.D, cremation and the Roman Empire were at their peaks. In fact, ancient Romans stored cremated remains in decorated urns like we do today. However, the early Christians still practiced traditional Jewish body disposition, and therefore disapproved of cremation. This proved to be ancient cremation’s downfall, because when Constantine made Christianity the official Roman religion in 400 A.D, the practice almost disappeared in favor of the traditional Jewish burial.

Cremation drifted out of history until around 1873 when an Italian professor displayed his new cremation chamber model at the Vienna Exposition. His new invention jump-started the cremation revolution on both sides of the Atlantic.The first modern cremation chamber in the United States was built in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1876 by Dr. Julius LeMoyne, with the second not far behind in Lancaster, PA in 1884. Soon, crematories were being built all across the US, and by the year 1900 there were 20 in operation.

The practice took off even more when, in 1913, Dr. Hugo Erichsen started the Cremation Association of America as a way to spread to word about this modern way of safely and hygienically disposing of bodies. The foundation was originally made up of doctors with concerns about the spread of diseases from whole-body burials to living humans.

This belief and the foundation continued to foster cremation popularity until the 1920s when it was proven that whole body burials, when done properly were just as safe for the public’s health. After that discovery, the Cremation Association of America switched gears and began promoting cremation not as a health choice but as a personal choice. The foundation changed its name to Cremation Association of North America (CANA), in 1975, and is still around today.

Cremation has been becoming more and more popular since the 1980s in America and around the world. This rise is due to a number of factors such as cost, environmental concerns, creativity, religion and more. While traditional burial is still the most commonly seen disposition method, studies show that might not always be the case. According to CANA, there were over 2,100 crematories in use in the US in 2009 performing over 9,000 cremations a year, and the numbers are still going up.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is honored to be a part of the continuing Palisade, CO cremation service tradition. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 for more information.

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO

History of the American Funeral Home

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO and the rest of the United States have long and fascinating history. Before the mid 1800s, the dead were never that far from home when they passed. So, the bodies were often displayed in the family home’s front room, or the parlor, immediately after death and before burial.

There were a few methods used to prolong decomposition, but they were not readily accepted. Therefore, funerals took place quickly, and in the home. Then, in 1865, President Lincoln’s body was embalmed after his assassination to prevent decomposition during the nationwide funeral train. As a result, people around the country began to accept the idea of embalming bodies as commonplace.

As embalming became more popular, families were able to expand the funeral services beyond the home. As the bodies were able to be transported and displayed, more neutral settings grew in popularity as families could invite more people to celebrate the deceased and host more formal events, creating the need for a formal funeral home or parlor. Formal cemeteries were also becoming more widespread in lieu of home burials, as the United States government formed military cemeteries for fallen soldiers after the war.

The Bucktrout family in Virginia saw a growing market, and rose to the occasion. Originally coffin and cabinet manufacturers, the Bucktrout family grew their business to include funeral home services similar to those we have today, becoming the country’s first funeral home.

The funeral home market grew, and businesses continued to expand. However, funeral homes were still all family owned and operated. In fact, most undertakers (as they were called then) used their home to run their funeral business. This is most likely where the name “funeral home” comes from.

More and more funeral homes were established in the 1900s all across the country. With this expansion, formal training for undertakers became crucial for further expansion and proper service. The conversation changed a bit, and they began to be known as funeral directors and morticians. The National Funeral Directors Association was formed in the early 1900s to help consumers view the members as professionals.

Coffin makers, florists, life insurance agencies and other connected fields followed suit, and the funeral home business continued to blossom into what it is today. By 1920, there were around 24,469 funeral homes in the United States, showing a 100% growth in just under 80 years.

Like other United States institutions, funeral homes grew out of Christian backgrounds. However with the relaxation of immigration laws in the 1960s, there was an influx of new beliefs and cultures. Funeral homes rose to the occasion, and began offering services for other ethnic and religious groups from Vietnamese and Eastern European to Buddhism and Hinduism.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is continuing the tradition of Palisade, CO funeral home service. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss.

Aspen, CO cremation services

How To Talk To Your Family About Preplanning Cremation Services

You know how important it is to preplan your Aspen, CO cremation services, but do you also know that you should talk to your family and loved ones about your plans? As necessary as this conversation is, it can also be very difficult. Loved ones don’t want to think about losing you, much less talk about the details of your cremation.

As hard as it is to talk about preplanning, your family will appreciate it in the long run. If you’re ready to start preplanning for your cremation, but aren’t quite sure how to breach the subject with your loved ones, use the following tips to help:

  1. Know What You Want – Don’t try and talk to your family about your post-death wishes until you know what they are. Take time before you bring up the subject to research, think about and decide precisely what you want. What kind of service do you want? Do you want a burial or cremation? Viewing or visitation? What’s the budget? Once you know the answer to those questions, you’ll be better able to express your concrete wishes to your family.
  2. Get Ready For High Emotions: While you’ve taken time to plan and get used to the idea of your own passing, your family and loved one’s most likely have not. The people you love will need some time to process all the emotions associated with your probable, eventual or impending death and loss. They might get angry with you, experience denial about the conversation’s necessity, or be just plain sad at the idea of losing you. If things get too emotional, take a break and continue the conversation once everyone has calmed down a bit.
  3. Listen and Answer: Even though your final wishes are ultimately your decision and all about what you want, your loved ones will still want to have some input. Be ready to listen to their concerns and to answer any questions they might have. If you don’t have the answer right away, take the time you need to come up with one.
  4. Stay Strong: While its important to listen to what your family has to say about your final wishes, it’s still mostly your decision at the end of the day. Don’t be afraid to be firm about what you want, and stand up for decisions that are important to you. Once you’ve come to a decision everyone can be happy with, it’s a great idea to have a legal document drawn up with all the details so there are no questions after you’re gone.

While discussing your death with your loved ones will never be easy, it’s always worth it because preplanning will give everyone peace of mind.

If you would like more assistance with preplanning a cremation service in Aspen, CO, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help. Visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or call us at (970) 255-8888.

funeral home in Aspen, CO

Obituaries and Funeral Homes

From choosing a funeral home in Aspen, CO to picking out flowers, there’s a lot to accomplish when you lose a loved one. Your long to-do list can be stressful, so why not learn some basic information about one of your tasks now to help assuage this stress? You can start with obituaries.

Obituaries are a traditional way to let family and friends publically celebrate the life of the deceased, and announce the death in a compassionate manner. To be better prepared to write an obituary for your lost loved one, here are the common parts of obituaries:

  • Announcement of Death – Obituaries usually start with basic information such as the name, age, and place of residence of the deceased. This is followed by the death announcement, including the time and place of death. Most people choose to use a softer word or term that “death,” such as “passed away”, “died”, “went to be with the Lord” etc. Many people are unsure whether or not to list the cause of death in the obituary. At the end of the day, the cause of death is only the family’s business, and does not need to be shared unless the immediate family chooses.
  • Biographical Sketch – The key word in this portion is “sketch.” Many people are tempted to write a full account of the deceased’s life. While some people may find that interesting or helpful, the obituary is only meant to detail the most important aspects of his life. Some key pieces to include are the date and place of birth, parent’s names including mother’s maiden name, date and place of marriage, birth name of spouse, education, work, and military service. Feel free to list events chronologically, or to take a more creative approach. Don’t forget to mention specific important relationships and the effect the deceased had on people’s lives.
  • Family – As the saying goes, the funeral is for the living. The same can be said for the obituary, so a key element is listing the surviving family members and loved ones. Take care to not forget anyone, but don’t feel the need to list every single member of the extended family.
  • Service Times – While tradition varies on this element, most obituaries include funeral information so people can attend if they choose. List the essentials: time, full date and place of service along with the name of the officiate; time, full date and place of burial or interment if applicable; and finally, time, full date and place of visitation.
  • Special Messages – Most people choose to include a special thank you or message at the end. This may also include a prayer or poem.
  • Photos – Include a photo. While this adds to the cost, it is a lovely way to remind people of their connected to the deceased.

Contact Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service by visiting 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501 or calling (970) 255-8888, to learn more about obituaries or Aspen, CO funeral homes.

cremation services in Grand Junction, CO

After Cremation Services

Whether you’re planning for your eventual passing or dealing with the recent death of a loved one, one big choice is body disposition. If you choose to go with cremation services in Grand Junction, CO, you have even more choices coming your way as there are quite a few options when it comes to cremated remains.

Just because you chose a cremation service doesn’t mean you can’t also have a burial. In fact, many people have both as you cane easily bury or entomb cremated remains. This option helps you stay more on track with traditional burials and funerals while also using cremation services. There are a few options for burial or entombment after cremation including:

  • Columbarium: Columbarium are spaces specifically dedicated to housing and interring cremated remains Most often found in churches, there are also a few freestanding columbarium options as well as those attached to cemeteries.
  • Memorial Object: A non-traditional burial method for cremated remains is in a special memorial object like a bench, grave marker, rock or even in a tree. This method and special objects help loved ones memorialize and celebrate their lost in more personalized ways.
  • Crypt or Mausoleum: Go more religious or familial with a crypt or mausoleum. These options are usually preferred by Roman Catholics, but can get pretty expensive.
  • Family Plot: The most traditional burial for cremation remains is in the family plot or cemetery. Burial in the family plot is an easy way to use cremation services while still enjoying classic burial and funeral traditions.

The most common, and traditional, way to inter cremated remains is by scattering. The options for scattering are almost limitless, but some widespread choices are:

  • Casting: Casting ashes simply means tossing the cremated remains on the wind, usually in a special location. Be sure to check the wind direction to avoid uncomfortable moments.
  • Raking: Raking ashes happens when a family member or loved one by pours the ashes over loose soil and rakes them to combine the two. Local ordinances and laws generally prevent raking at any old spot, so make sure to check with the authorities before raking in a public garden or park.
  • Water Scattering: You can also scatter ashes into any body of water, again with permission from the local authorities. Another version of water scattering is to sink a water-soluble urn into the lake, river or ocean.
  • Ringing: Ringing involves more of a ceremony than other post-cremation choices. It involves forming a ring around an object like a house, tree or other special thing with the ashes, almost to compound the idea that the deceased is always with you and protecting you.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is an expert Grand Junction, CO cremation service provider. We have a wide range of options, and would be happy to help you in your time of need Please visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more.

funeral homes in Grand Junction, CO

6 Interesting Funeral Home Facts

Most people don’t think about funerals and funeral homes in Grand Junction, CO until its time to plan or visit one. This is understandable, but it’s not helpful when you’re suddenly facing a loss and have to plan a funeral. Use this list of 6 interesting funeral home facts to help you be better prepared.

  1. You Cannot Authorize Your Own Funeral – While you can preplan and prepay for your funeral, you cannot sign the final authorization for your own burial or cremation because of the Right to Control law. This law, except in situations where a funeral agent is designated, outlines a specific family hierarchy that shows who has the right to authorize the funeral of a recently deceased person.
  2. You Can Have a Funeral Wherever and Whenever – Funerals don’t have to be held in funeral homes anymore. In fact, they can take whatever shape you feel best reflect the deceased’s and your family’s wishes. From a religious mass in a church for immediate family to memorial service in a funeral home six months later for out-of-town guest, the sky is the limit as long as it falls under the law.
  3. Coffins and Caskets Are Two Different Things – Coffins and caskets are different things. Coffins have six sides and are shaped like a hexagon to go along with the lines of a human body, meaning tapered at the head and foot with a wider construction at the shoulder. A casket, on the other hand, is rectangular with four sides adjoined at right angles.
  4. You Can Choose a Funeral and Cremation – Funerals and cremations are not mutually exclusive. You can have a viewing with an open casket before a cremation, or can host a funeral or memorial service with the cremains or even a commemorative video anytime after the cremation. Some people have services with an urn on display rather than a casket.
  5. Embalming is Optional – Embalming is not always required by law. You can choose to skip embalming or be embalmed with eco-friendly preservatives. You always have the right to choose a body disposition method that does not require embalming if you don’t want to be embalmed. However, some funeral homes may require embalming depending on public viewings of the body and similar services.
  6. You Can Compare Prices – Prices actually vary from one funeral home to another, and you have the right to call and ask what prices are in order to compare. Funeral homes must provide you with a General Price List that outlines their prices when asked as per California state law. Always do your research to make sure you’re getting a good deal, and don’t be afraid to ask for a price list as per your rights.

These are only 6 out of many unknown funeral facts. Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, can give you any more Grand Junction, CO funeral home information you may need. Call us today at (970) 255-8888.

funeral home in Palisade, CO

Funeral Homes and Memorial Jewelry

Losing a loved one is always hard, especially since you can’t keep them close to you. However, thanks to memorial jewelry, you can keep your lost loved one close long after you leave the funeral home in Palisade, CO.

Though it might sound odd at first, memorial jewelry is a great way to memorialize a lost loved one. What is memorial jewelry? It comes in many forms, from necklaces and rings to lockets, pendants and bracelets, but every form is a special reminder of the deceased.

Once a body is cremated, the family sends the remains to a jeweler. The remains, consisting of minerals like calcium phosphates, are combined with molten glass gold, silver, platinum or other materials using special encasement methods to mold the remains and the metals together with the objective being to display the cremated remains.

Since every person’s chemical makeup is slightly different, every piece of memorial jewelry will have a slightly different chemical reaction and resulting appearance. In other words, every memorial jewelry item will be as unique as the person it represents. Some families also choose to include items like hair or dried flowers in the piece for even more uniqueness.

If you’re considering memorial jewelry for your lost loved one, there are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • Material – Though you can have memorial jewelry in almost any material, you should think about how and how often you’re going to wear it, as some materials are more durable than others. For example, if you’re making a ring that you’re only going to wear on special occasions, resin is fine. However, if you want to wear the ring on a daily basis, you need a stronger material like silver.
  • Style – You should choose memorial jewelry in a style that you will actually wear. If you don’t like big pendants, maybe choose a small bracelet or locket. Be sure that you choose a style that fits your comfort level.
  • The Deceased – Also keep in mind how the deceased would want to be memorialized. Think about his or her styles, preferences, and even interests for inspiration. How do you think you could best memorialize your lost loved one?

Memorial jewelry is just one of the many options you have when it comes to memorialization of lost loved one. If its not your style, you can always choose a more traditional method like a cremation urn, scattering, burial, or headstone. It won’t matter what you choose as long as the choice comes from a place of respect and love for the deceased.

If you want to learn more about memorial jewelry, or other Palisade, CO funeral home services, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service can help. Please feel free to stop by and visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about what we can do for you.

cremation in Palisade, CO

Memorial Services

While a cremation in Palisade, CO might seem clinical or impersonal, it’s actually a great way to give your lost loved one a unique, meaningful and respectful memorial or service. In fact, cremations make it simple to make sure your deceased loved one’s memorial service is unique to him or her.

Memorial services are for both the living and the dead, as they help honor the deceased while providing a healthy and constructive place for the living to grieve. An ideal service helps you and your loved ones mourn the loss while bringing together those that cared for the deceased so that everyone can pay tribute in a positive way.

It can be overwhelming to plan a memorial service for after a cremation, especially when you’re grieving a loss. Use these tips to help you plan a memorial service for your lost loved one after a cremation:

  • Date and Time – One nice thing about cremation services as opposed to burials and funerals is that you don’t have a deadline or specific timeline. With a burial, you need to have the funeral service within a few days of death because of decomposition. With a cremation service, however, you have as much time as you want since the body is already broken down. You can easily plan memorial services at later dates to allow people to come from out of town, or to have it be on an important or meaningful day.
  • Creativity – Once you’ve chosen a day, you can start planning the specifics. There are practically zero restrictions on what services should or need to be, so feel free to get creative. Think about the deceased and what he liked, stood for, or is most remembered for and expand on that. Have a theme party, make video tributes, scatter ashes in a ceremony, or even do things the deceased liked to do. For example, if the deceased loved golf, have a golf themed cremation service. You can order a golf ball urn for the ashes, and have guests take turns at a driving range. If the deceased really loved one specific park, hold the service in the park and scatter his ashes there (with a proper permit.)
  • Ask for Help – While planning memorial services can be bittersweet or even exciting, they also happen during a time of loss and can bring up stressful feelings. You might need help with the planning, and that’s OK. Ask for help from other family members or loved ones, or hire professionals. Find a funeral home nearby that has experience with memorial services to help you plan your event with compassion and attention.

The sky really is the limit when it comes to planning memorial services for after cremations. If you want more inspiration or guidance for a memorial service, or want to learn more about your options for Palisade, CO cremations, contact Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service by visiting 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or calling (970) 255-8888.

cremation services in Aspen, CO

The Different Kinds of Cremation Services

Cremations provide lots of different choices in terms of planning, personalizing and budget. They are flexible so you and your loved ones can create a meaningful celebration of the deceased’s life, and save time and money when it comes to planning and execution of the event. But did you know that there are a few different kinds of cremation services in Aspen, CO?

The three main kinds are traditional, memorial, and direct. Each one offers different versions of the basic cremation idea, with the main differences appearing in price, planning, and timeline.

  1. Traditional Cremation Services – Traditional cremation services are the marriage of a regular funeral and a cremation. They consist of a classic funeral followed by a cremation rather than a burial. As with a funeral, traditional cremation services have a wake or visitation within two or three days of the death with the body present. They come with more costs over other types of cremation because of embalming and caskets. Embalming is the process in which the body is preserved for the viewing. The viewing and funeral also require a casket with some type of ornamentation, not just a plain cremation box. Traditional cremation services generally involve a funeral, and are usually hosted by a religious leader, family member, or funeral celebrant.
  2. Memorial Cremation Services – Memorial cremation services are almost identical to traditional cremation services, except that the body is not present at the accompanying service. This type of cremation service is generally held at a later date than the traditional variation, because the body is cremated directly after death so there is no need to rush the service in fear of decomposition. The body can be present at the memorial service in less traditional ways, like in a cremation urn or in form of photos, videos or drawings. Since there is no body, the service can be held almost anywhere, even more information locations. Memorial cremation services help families save money on embalming and caskets since the body is not present, but they do still have other funeral-associated costs like flowers, programs, photos, catering and more.
  3. Direct Cremation Services – Direct cremation services are the most basic type of cremation services. They are cost effective and efficient because, as the name denotes, the body is cremated directly after death and the remains are united with the family without a ceremony or service. Direct cremation service costs are usually all included in one flat fee, from body transportation to the cremation itself. While this variation saves money, it doesn’t offer any sort of celebration or honor for the deceased’s life.

At the end of the day, the decision as to what type of cremation services you want is very personal. It depends on what’s important to you, be it tradition, personalization, or budget. No matter what kind of cremation services you want, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service can help. We offer a range of Aspen, CO cremation services. Please visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or call us at (970) 255-8888 to learn more.