Monthly Archives: June 2019

Aspen, CO cremation services

How To Talk To Your Family About Preplanning Cremation Services

You know how important it is to preplan your Aspen, CO cremation services, but do you also know that you should talk to your family and loved ones about your plans? As necessary as this conversation is, it can also be very difficult. Loved ones don’t want to think about losing you, much less talk about the details of your cremation.

As hard as it is to talk about preplanning, your family will appreciate it in the long run. If you’re ready to start preplanning for your cremation, but aren’t quite sure how to breach the subject with your loved ones, use the following tips to help:

  1. Know What You Want – Don’t try and talk to your family about your post-death wishes until you know what they are. Take time before you bring up the subject to research, think about and decide precisely what you want. What kind of service do you want? Do you want a burial or cremation? Viewing or visitation? What’s the budget? Once you know the answer to those questions, you’ll be better able to express your concrete wishes to your family.
  2. Get Ready For High Emotions: While you’ve taken time to plan and get used to the idea of your own passing, your family and loved one’s most likely have not. The people you love will need some time to process all the emotions associated with your probable, eventual or impending death and loss. They might get angry with you, experience denial about the conversation’s necessity, or be just plain sad at the idea of losing you. If things get too emotional, take a break and continue the conversation once everyone has calmed down a bit.
  3. Listen and Answer: Even though your final wishes are ultimately your decision and all about what you want, your loved ones will still want to have some input. Be ready to listen to their concerns and to answer any questions they might have. If you don’t have the answer right away, take the time you need to come up with one.
  4. Stay Strong: While its important to listen to what your family has to say about your final wishes, it’s still mostly your decision at the end of the day. Don’t be afraid to be firm about what you want, and stand up for decisions that are important to you. Once you’ve come to a decision everyone can be happy with, it’s a great idea to have a legal document drawn up with all the details so there are no questions after you’re gone.

While discussing your death with your loved ones will never be easy, it’s always worth it because preplanning will give everyone peace of mind.

If you would like more assistance with preplanning a cremation service in Aspen, CO, Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help. Visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or call us at (970) 255-8888.

funeral home in Aspen, CO

Obituaries and Funeral Homes

From choosing a funeral home in Aspen, CO to picking out flowers, there’s a lot to accomplish when you lose a loved one. Your long to-do list can be stressful, so why not learn some basic information about one of your tasks now to help assuage this stress? You can start with obituaries.

Obituaries are a traditional way to let family and friends publically celebrate the life of the deceased, and announce the death in a compassionate manner. To be better prepared to write an obituary for your lost loved one, here are the common parts of obituaries:

  • Announcement of Death – Obituaries usually start with basic information such as the name, age, and place of residence of the deceased. This is followed by the death announcement, including the time and place of death. Most people choose to use a softer word or term that “death,” such as “passed away”, “died”, “went to be with the Lord” etc. Many people are unsure whether or not to list the cause of death in the obituary. At the end of the day, the cause of death is only the family’s business, and does not need to be shared unless the immediate family chooses.
  • Biographical Sketch – The key word in this portion is “sketch.” Many people are tempted to write a full account of the deceased’s life. While some people may find that interesting or helpful, the obituary is only meant to detail the most important aspects of his life. Some key pieces to include are the date and place of birth, parent’s names including mother’s maiden name, date and place of marriage, birth name of spouse, education, work, and military service. Feel free to list events chronologically, or to take a more creative approach. Don’t forget to mention specific important relationships and the effect the deceased had on people’s lives.
  • Family – As the saying goes, the funeral is for the living. The same can be said for the obituary, so a key element is listing the surviving family members and loved ones. Take care to not forget anyone, but don’t feel the need to list every single member of the extended family.
  • Service Times – While tradition varies on this element, most obituaries include funeral information so people can attend if they choose. List the essentials: time, full date and place of service along with the name of the officiate; time, full date and place of burial or interment if applicable; and finally, time, full date and place of visitation.
  • Special Messages – Most people choose to include a special thank you or message at the end. This may also include a prayer or poem.
  • Photos – Include a photo. While this adds to the cost, it is a lovely way to remind people of their connected to the deceased.

Contact Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service by visiting 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501 or calling (970) 255-8888, to learn more about obituaries or Aspen, CO funeral homes.

cremation services in Grand Junction, CO

After Cremation Services

Whether you’re planning for your eventual passing or dealing with the recent death of a loved one, one big choice is body disposition. If you choose to go with cremation services in Grand Junction, CO, you have even more choices coming your way as there are quite a few options when it comes to cremated remains.

Just because you chose a cremation service doesn’t mean you can’t also have a burial. In fact, many people have both as you cane easily bury or entomb cremated remains. This option helps you stay more on track with traditional burials and funerals while also using cremation services. There are a few options for burial or entombment after cremation including:

  • Columbarium: Columbarium are spaces specifically dedicated to housing and interring cremated remains Most often found in churches, there are also a few freestanding columbarium options as well as those attached to cemeteries.
  • Memorial Object: A non-traditional burial method for cremated remains is in a special memorial object like a bench, grave marker, rock or even in a tree. This method and special objects help loved ones memorialize and celebrate their lost in more personalized ways.
  • Crypt or Mausoleum: Go more religious or familial with a crypt or mausoleum. These options are usually preferred by Roman Catholics, but can get pretty expensive.
  • Family Plot: The most traditional burial for cremation remains is in the family plot or cemetery. Burial in the family plot is an easy way to use cremation services while still enjoying classic burial and funeral traditions.

The most common, and traditional, way to inter cremated remains is by scattering. The options for scattering are almost limitless, but some widespread choices are:

  • Casting: Casting ashes simply means tossing the cremated remains on the wind, usually in a special location. Be sure to check the wind direction to avoid uncomfortable moments.
  • Raking: Raking ashes happens when a family member or loved one by pours the ashes over loose soil and rakes them to combine the two. Local ordinances and laws generally prevent raking at any old spot, so make sure to check with the authorities before raking in a public garden or park.
  • Water Scattering: You can also scatter ashes into any body of water, again with permission from the local authorities. Another version of water scattering is to sink a water-soluble urn into the lake, river or ocean.
  • Ringing: Ringing involves more of a ceremony than other post-cremation choices. It involves forming a ring around an object like a house, tree or other special thing with the ashes, almost to compound the idea that the deceased is always with you and protecting you.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is an expert Grand Junction, CO cremation service provider. We have a wide range of options, and would be happy to help you in your time of need Please visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more.

funeral homes in Grand Junction, CO

6 Interesting Funeral Home Facts

Most people don’t think about funerals and funeral homes in Grand Junction, CO until its time to plan or visit one. This is understandable, but it’s not helpful when you’re suddenly facing a loss and have to plan a funeral. Use this list of 6 interesting funeral home facts to help you be better prepared.

  1. You Cannot Authorize Your Own Funeral – While you can preplan and prepay for your funeral, you cannot sign the final authorization for your own burial or cremation because of the Right to Control law. This law, except in situations where a funeral agent is designated, outlines a specific family hierarchy that shows who has the right to authorize the funeral of a recently deceased person.
  2. You Can Have a Funeral Wherever and Whenever – Funerals don’t have to be held in funeral homes anymore. In fact, they can take whatever shape you feel best reflect the deceased’s and your family’s wishes. From a religious mass in a church for immediate family to memorial service in a funeral home six months later for out-of-town guest, the sky is the limit as long as it falls under the law.
  3. Coffins and Caskets Are Two Different Things – Coffins and caskets are different things. Coffins have six sides and are shaped like a hexagon to go along with the lines of a human body, meaning tapered at the head and foot with a wider construction at the shoulder. A casket, on the other hand, is rectangular with four sides adjoined at right angles.
  4. You Can Choose a Funeral and Cremation – Funerals and cremations are not mutually exclusive. You can have a viewing with an open casket before a cremation, or can host a funeral or memorial service with the cremains or even a commemorative video anytime after the cremation. Some people have services with an urn on display rather than a casket.
  5. Embalming is Optional – Embalming is not always required by law. You can choose to skip embalming or be embalmed with eco-friendly preservatives. You always have the right to choose a body disposition method that does not require embalming if you don’t want to be embalmed. However, some funeral homes may require embalming depending on public viewings of the body and similar services.
  6. You Can Compare Prices – Prices actually vary from one funeral home to another, and you have the right to call and ask what prices are in order to compare. Funeral homes must provide you with a General Price List that outlines their prices when asked as per California state law. Always do your research to make sure you’re getting a good deal, and don’t be afraid to ask for a price list as per your rights.

These are only 6 out of many unknown funeral facts. Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, can give you any more Grand Junction, CO funeral home information you may need. Call us today at (970) 255-8888.