Monthly Archives: July 2019

cremation services in Grand Junction, CO

Preplanning Cremation Services

Death is always difficult for the bereaved, and it always will be. However, there is one way you can make your passing a little easier on your loved ones: choosing to preplan your cremation services in Grand Junction, CO. Preplanning your cremation can not only make sure your wishes are followed but can also relieve your family and loved ones of the stress of dealing with the details after you’re gone.

While there are a lot of decisions that go into a cremation, preplanning isn’t as hard as you might think. In fact, preplanning can be broken down into a few simple steps. The first step is to decide where you want to be cremated. Look into funeral homes and crematories in the area, making sure to investigate pricing and services offered. Once you decide on a location, you then have to consider what kind of cremation you want. Some of the most common options include:

  • Traditional setting with a funeral service before the cremation, generally with the casket present
  • Memorial service after the cremation, typically similar in structure to a funeral but the urn or a photo takes place of the casket
  • Internment ceremony in which the ashes are interred or scattered after the cremation

You then have to think about and decide on the smaller cremation details, including what kind of urn you want, where you want to be buried or scattered, or if you want to go in a different direction all together. There are many options for the ashes after cremation such as:

  • Internment at a cemetery or family plot
  • Scattering in a special place, over water, or even in the air. There are ash scattering restrictions that vary by state and county
  • Kept in an urn by family or friends

The final step is to think about how you will pay for your cremation. Be sure to contact your life insurance company, because, even though they won’t begin funding before death, it’s a good idea to make sure they understand your plans. Explain your insurance coverage to your family so they also understand how your insurance will cover the services. If you are planning on providing the funding yourself, make a specific plan and put it in place. Make sure everyone involved understands who is covering what and what kind of budget you have.

It’s important to remember that the preplanning process isn’t something you should do on your own. Since you will be gone when the decisions are put into action, you need to be sure you clearly communicate with your family, friends and other loved ones about your wishes.

Your family can also be a part of the process, and help you make some difficult decisions such as where the cremation will be and what kind of memorial. In talking about these decisions with loved ones, be sure to document what you decide, either in your will or with the funeral home you have selected.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, can help you with preplanning or any other Grand Junction, CO cremation service need. Give us a call at (970) 255-8888 today.

funeral home in Grand Junction, CO

From Death To The Funeral Home

It may seem impossible to get ready for a funeral home in Grand Junction, CO after a death. Losing a loved one is hard enough without all the stress of details, decisions and planning. However, if you follow these 7 steps, you will have a much easier time preparing for a funeral or cremation:

1. Report the Death – The first step is to report the death to the proper authorities. If the death is at a hospital, nursing home, or hospice, the officials there will know what to do and will make the report for you. If you are at home, or have no other options, call 911.

2. Prepare To Work With A Funeral Director – You will need the assistance of a funeral director to complete the death certificate, transport and store the body. Take note if the deceased made pre-arrangements for his or her funeral, and be prepared to relay these wishes to the funeral director.

3. Pick a Type of Service – There are several funeral service and cremation options you need to be prepared to choose from:

  • Funerals, in which the service is held before the body is cremated or buried and the body is present
  • Memorials, in which the service is help after the body is buried or cremated and therefore not present
  • Graveside services in which the funeral takes place at the grave

4. Make Cemetery Arrangements – If you choose a burial rather than a cremation you will need to make cemetery arrangements. Decide where the burial will take place, and if necessary purchase a plot. If you’re unsure where to start, your funeral home will most likely be affiliated with a cemetery and can help you find a plot. You could also check with your church, synagogue or other place of worship for further guidance.

5. Make Funeral Arrangements – Feel free to get creative when making funeral or memorial arrangements to make the service personal and meaningful. Flowers, music, pre or post service events and other special touches help make the service personal for you and the deceased.

6. Inform The Family and Write Death Notice – Personally inform all close family, friends and loved ones of the death, ideally over the phone or in person. If you’re nervous, take the time to write a script to help you make key points. Don’t forget to write and release a death notice to notify the rest of the friends, coworkers, associates etc.

7. List Pre-Funeral Tasks – Make a list of what you need to accomplish before the funeral to help you stay organized and not forget anything important. This list could include your attire, personal items or collecting photos.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service is here to help guide you from a loss to the funeral home with our experience and expertise. You can visit us at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, or give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about our Grand Junction, CO funeral home services.

cremation services in Palisade, CO

Cremation Service History In America And Beyond

Though cremation services in Palisade, CO have become more popular in recent years, they aren’t a new fad at all. In fact, historians believe that humans started burning their dead as early as 3000 B.C, as they have discovered pottery shards and urns that service as evidence.

Cremation became more and more popular around Europe and what we now call the Middle East until Homer’s time, around 800 B.C, when it became the most common disposition method. This rise in cremation is assumed to be because of the growing number of dead from both war and disease.

By 395 A.D, cremation and the Roman Empire were at their peaks. In fact, ancient Romans stored cremated remains in decorated urns like we do today. However, the early Christians still practiced traditional Jewish body disposition, and therefore disapproved of cremation. This proved to be ancient cremation’s downfall, because when Constantine made Christianity the official Roman religion in 400 A.D, the practice almost disappeared in favor of the traditional Jewish burial.

Cremation drifted out of history until around 1873 when an Italian professor displayed his new cremation chamber model at the Vienna Exposition. His new invention jump-started the cremation revolution on both sides of the Atlantic.The first modern cremation chamber in the United States was built in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1876 by Dr. Julius LeMoyne, with the second not far behind in Lancaster, PA in 1884. Soon, crematories were being built all across the US, and by the year 1900 there were 20 in operation.

The practice took off even more when, in 1913, Dr. Hugo Erichsen started the Cremation Association of America as a way to spread to word about this modern way of safely and hygienically disposing of bodies. The foundation was originally made up of doctors with concerns about the spread of diseases from whole-body burials to living humans.

This belief and the foundation continued to foster cremation popularity until the 1920s when it was proven that whole body burials, when done properly were just as safe for the public’s health. After that discovery, the Cremation Association of America switched gears and began promoting cremation not as a health choice but as a personal choice. The foundation changed its name to Cremation Association of North America (CANA), in 1975, and is still around today.

Cremation has been becoming more and more popular since the 1980s in America and around the world. This rise is due to a number of factors such as cost, environmental concerns, creativity, religion and more. While traditional burial is still the most commonly seen disposition method, studies show that might not always be the case. According to CANA, there were over 2,100 crematories in use in the US in 2009 performing over 9,000 cremations a year, and the numbers are still going up.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is honored to be a part of the continuing Palisade, CO cremation service tradition. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 for more information.

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO

History of the American Funeral Home

Funeral homes in Palisade, CO and the rest of the United States have long and fascinating history. Before the mid 1800s, the dead were never that far from home when they passed. So, the bodies were often displayed in the family home’s front room, or the parlor, immediately after death and before burial.

There were a few methods used to prolong decomposition, but they were not readily accepted. Therefore, funerals took place quickly, and in the home. Then, in 1865, President Lincoln’s body was embalmed after his assassination to prevent decomposition during the nationwide funeral train. As a result, people around the country began to accept the idea of embalming bodies as commonplace.

As embalming became more popular, families were able to expand the funeral services beyond the home. As the bodies were able to be transported and displayed, more neutral settings grew in popularity as families could invite more people to celebrate the deceased and host more formal events, creating the need for a formal funeral home or parlor. Formal cemeteries were also becoming more widespread in lieu of home burials, as the United States government formed military cemeteries for fallen soldiers after the war.

The Bucktrout family in Virginia saw a growing market, and rose to the occasion. Originally coffin and cabinet manufacturers, the Bucktrout family grew their business to include funeral home services similar to those we have today, becoming the country’s first funeral home.

The funeral home market grew, and businesses continued to expand. However, funeral homes were still all family owned and operated. In fact, most undertakers (as they were called then) used their home to run their funeral business. This is most likely where the name “funeral home” comes from.

More and more funeral homes were established in the 1900s all across the country. With this expansion, formal training for undertakers became crucial for further expansion and proper service. The conversation changed a bit, and they began to be known as funeral directors and morticians. The National Funeral Directors Association was formed in the early 1900s to help consumers view the members as professionals.

Coffin makers, florists, life insurance agencies and other connected fields followed suit, and the funeral home business continued to blossom into what it is today. By 1920, there were around 24,469 funeral homes in the United States, showing a 100% growth in just under 80 years.

Like other United States institutions, funeral homes grew out of Christian backgrounds. However with the relaxation of immigration laws in the 1960s, there was an influx of new beliefs and cultures. Funeral homes rose to the occasion, and began offering services for other ethnic and religious groups from Vietnamese and Eastern European to Buddhism and Hinduism.

Brown’s Cremation & Funeral Service, located at 904 N 7th St Grand Junction, CO 81501, is continuing the tradition of Palisade, CO funeral home service. Please give us a call at (970) 255-8888 to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss.